Mayne Mechanical

Mayne Mechanical Mayne Mechanical is a full-fledged heating and cooling company, which means that we do it all. The most dependable air conditioning company in your area is Mayne Mechanical.

Our experienced technicians, high-quality products and friendly, effective service ensure superior comfort for our customers. Mayne Mechanical will respond promptly and deliver quality work at a competitive price. You can depend on Mayne Mechanical to do whatever it takes to keep you comfortable all year long. We specialize in everything from new air conditioning systems to electronic air cleaners

Our experienced technicians, high-quality products and friendly, effective service ensure superior comfort for our customers. Mayne Mechanical will respond promptly and deliver quality work at a competitive price. You can depend on Mayne Mechanical to do whatever it takes to keep you comfortable all year long. We specialize in everything from new air conditioning systems to electronic air cleaners

Operating as usual

03/02/2021

Commercial HVAC service Technician
Experience a must.

02/24/2021
UV Air Purification

With COVID-19 being part of our lives. We are happy to install UV light systems to keep viruses and germs at bay.

02/24/2021

Commercial sheet metal installers and helpers.

02/24/2021

Commercial HVAC Service Technician
Mayne Mechanical - Baltimore, MD
HVAC Service Technicians
Looking for a service tech to service commercial HVAC equipment consisting of packaged rooftop equipment, VAV, VRF, heat pumps, cooling towers, pumps, control systems.
Experience - 5 Yrs W/Journeyman & CFC certification. Someone able to work independently and communicate with customers.
Benefits include - Paid vacation, personal leave, health insurance, life insurance, disability, company truck and tablet.
Job Type: Full-time
Job Type: Full-time

03/16/2017

Something to think about

Mayne Mechanical has some new vans to show off.
10/19/2016

Mayne Mechanical has some new vans to show off.

Hair club for men in Annapolis MD. It's not just a job. It's a job well done.
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Hair club for men in Annapolis MD. It's not just a job. It's a job well done.

Morty's Deli at Maryland Live.
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Morty's Deli at Maryland Live.

Crane lift
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Crane lift

05/20/2014

History of Refrigeration
A Brief History of Refrigeration
J. Caldwell, 1943-2008

Not long after Man began to use fire to cook and to keep himself warm, he found ways to cool his food and himself. Some believe that the invention of beer provided the impetus to develop refrigeration. We can understand the urgency, but the truth is lost in the mists of time.

In northern climes, early man found he could keep food longer if he buried it in the cool earth or stored it in caves. He probably found edible dead game encased in ice, and began to harvest and store ice as a means of refrigeration. But what about hot climates? How did man try to cope with the blazing heat of the desert? The remains of pottery found all over the world show that unglazed clay containers were widely used for water receptacles. Being porous, the unglazed pottery allows water to pe*****te the pot and ev***rate on the outside surface, cooling the pot and its contents. The drier the climate, the colder the result. There is an indication that the ancient Egyptians invented comfort cooling, using slaves to fan air through suspended damp fabric to cool the royal personages on hot days. This ev***rative air cooling exists today in the “swamp coolers” that we see sprouting on roofs in the southwest United States. Fountains were built for more than aesthetic reasons: the splashing water partially ev***rates, cooling the remaining water and the surrounding air.

A particularly interesting form of cooling is radiation to the sky. At night, the earth radiates heat energy into space. In parts of the middle east, due to the dry, clear air, ice will form on the surface of pans of water exposed to the night sky, even though the surrounding air is above freezing. This process was actually used in ancient times to produce ice for cooling drinks. In the 1500's it was discovered that certain metal salts such as sodium or potassium nitrate, when added to water, produce a hypothermic mixture, cold enough to form ice in pure water. This process was used in France before 1700 to make iced and frozen drinks by suspending a container of juice or pure water in a bath of the cold salt mixture. So maybe the search for a cold drink really was the impetus for refrigeration.

In 1748 a professor at the University of Glasgow demonstrated the formation of ice on the surface of a flask containing ev***rating ether under a partial vacuum. This would have been the birth of the compression-ev***ration cycle system most common today, if he had captured, compressed, condensed and re-ev***rated the ether v***r. Over the next century various methods of cooling were devised, primarily to cool foodstuffs. The first U.S. patent for mechanical refrigeration was issued in 1851 to a Florida doctor who developed an air-cycle system to build ice, which was then used to cool a yellow fever ward. This method is used today for in-flight air conditioning on our commercial jet passenger aircraft, and uses air as the refrigerant, compressing and expanding it to cool it. By the time of our civil war, mechanical refrigeration systems using the compression-ev***ration or the air-cycle were being commercially used to make ice, which was then used to cool meat, milk and beer. The first ammonia compression system was developed in France in 1859, and various refrigerants were used with varying success, including water, carbon dioxide and sulphur dioxide. Ammonia became the primary refrigerant of choice, and is still in use today. “Freon” and other halogenated fluorocarbon refrigerants were developed after World War I to replace the toxic ammonia. Now the search is on for efficient refrigerants that do not contain the chlorine compounds that we believe are destructive to the ozone layer of our atmosphere.

Many early systems were used to manufacture bulk ice, for use in food transportation. These were rated according to their daily ice production, expressed in “tons”. Thus, a one-ton system could produce 2000 lb. of ice in 24-hours (12,000 Btu per hour). This arcane unit of measure is still in use today in the U.S. for refrigeration and air-conditioning systems. High-tech forms of refrigeration are being developed, including thermo-electric and acoustic, as we find more and better ways to make things cold.

This article is published in Loving Memory of our friend and Colleague, Mr John Caldwell
Some historical details in this article are taken from A History of Refrigeration by Roger Thevenot, published by The International Institute of Refrigeration, Paris, 1979, English translation by J. C. Fidler.

Orthopedic Associates in Catonsville Maryland
05/20/2014

Orthopedic Associates in Catonsville Maryland

Orthopedic Associates in Catonsville Maryland

05/20/2014

Merkle building in Columbia,MD

Address

5401 New Expansion Dr
Sykesville, MD
21784

Opening Hours

Monday 7am - 5pm
Tuesday 7am - 5pm
Wednesday 7am - 5pm
Thursday 7am - 5pm
Friday 7am - 5pm

Telephone

(410) 781-0390

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