Navy Ray's

Navy Ray's Currently open only by appointment, we try to offer the cool, the funky, the unusual. Although we hope to have something for everyone, we tend to specialize in automotive, industrial, advertising, painted furniture and folk art.

Ray Miller was born in 1918 in York, PA. When he was 14 years old, he got his first tattoo. By the time he was 16, he mail-ordered his first tattoo “outfit” and began inking his friends. A few years later, he was traveling the carnival circuit in South Central PA, setting up his booth, and putting his mark on many a hide. Ray was a tattoo artist. He was also a cowboy. A prize fighter. A soldier. A cook. A farmer. A race car driver. He was an amateur archeologist. Of all the many things Ray was good at, he was best at being a Grandfather. He was mine. Over the years, Grandpa Ray taught me many things. He shared his wisdom and his view on life. He taught me to appreciate the old, the worn out, the forgotten. How do make do with what you had, and to see the value in the discarded. It seemed to me that he could fix anything, and seemingly make something out of nothing. He rarely threw anything away. In fact, it was usually the opposite - rescuing “treasures” from dumps and trash heaps. I remember spending hours marveling over all the cool old“stuff”stashed in the barn, the chicken coup, and both garages. During one visit to Grandpa and Nan’s house, I announced that I was going to college to become something called a graphic designer. After a feeble explanation of what, exactly, a graphic designer was, Grandpa lead me up into their attic, where after a few minutes of shuffling boxes, he unearthed his long forgotten tattoo art. I was astounded. When Grandpa passed away in 1998, my one brother got his boxing gloves. My other brother got his favorite saddle. I asked if I could have his tattoo “stuff”. But that’s not all I inherited from Grandpa Ray. I also inherited his passion for rescuing treasures.

Operating as usual

Somehow, over the years, I've managed to accumulate no less than 10 antique neon sign transformers. They're heavy. Any t...
07/10/2020

Somehow, over the years, I've managed to accumulate no less than 10 antique neon sign transformers. They're heavy. Any takers?

Perhaps unique 19th century photogravure print of two children playing pool.The photograph was taken by M.B. Parkinson, ...
03/31/2020

Perhaps unique 19th century photogravure print of two children playing pool.

The photograph was taken by M.B. Parkinson, who worked in the New York City area during the latter part of the 1800s and is most famously known for his sepia toned images of Cupid Awake, and Cupid Asleep.

This image was seemingly commissioned and published in 1893 (4 years before the Cupid photos) by the Brunswick Balke Collender Co., of billiards and pool fame. The boy is demonstrating the billiard technique of “The Masse”*

The heavy cardstock paper on which the photograph is printed is in very good condition with sharp corners and edges. It has however been victim to tannin stains from the wood backing boards and frame. It also has some minor foxing spots. All of this can be restored by a professional paper conservator. In the meantime, I have removed the print from the frame and placed acid free art paper between the print and the original wood backing boards to resist any further damage.

The frame is very nice. Period, and seemingly original to the print. Original wavy glass.

Overall size is 29.5” x 34.5”. The image area (that inside of the original matt) measures 16.5” x 22”.

*A shot in billiards made by hitting the cue ball with the cue held nearly vertically; the cue ball spins around another ball before hitting the object ball. This technique was invented by Captain François Mingaud born 4 January France, died 23 December 1847. He was an infantry officer in the French army and a carom billiards player. He is credited as the inventor of the leather tip for a billiards cue, a “possibly not original idea” that he perfected whilst imprisoned in Paris for political outspokenness. This revolutionized the game of billiards, allowing the cue ball to be finely manipulated by the application of spin.
In 1807 he was released from prison and began to demonstrate his invention and spin technique in Paris. Part of his showmanship involved feigning extreme horror as the cue ball recoiled towards him after striking the object ball, and then persuading the audience that the balls should be seized and condemned because they were “tormented by a devil”.

Perhaps unique 19th century photogravure print of two children playing pool.

The photograph was taken by M.B. Parkinson, who worked in the New York City area during the latter part of the 1800s and is most famously known for his sepia toned images of Cupid Awake, and Cupid Asleep.

This image was seemingly commissioned and published in 1893 (4 years before the Cupid photos) by the Brunswick Balke Collender Co., of billiards and pool fame. The boy is demonstrating the billiard technique of “The Masse”*

The heavy cardstock paper on which the photograph is printed is in very good condition with sharp corners and edges. It has however been victim to tannin stains from the wood backing boards and frame. It also has some minor foxing spots. All of this can be restored by a professional paper conservator. In the meantime, I have removed the print from the frame and placed acid free art paper between the print and the original wood backing boards to resist any further damage.

The frame is very nice. Period, and seemingly original to the print. Original wavy glass.

Overall size is 29.5” x 34.5”. The image area (that inside of the original matt) measures 16.5” x 22”.

*A shot in billiards made by hitting the cue ball with the cue held nearly vertically; the cue ball spins around another ball before hitting the object ball. This technique was invented by Captain François Mingaud born 4 January France, died 23 December 1847. He was an infantry officer in the French army and a carom billiards player. He is credited as the inventor of the leather tip for a billiards cue, a “possibly not original idea” that he perfected whilst imprisoned in Paris for political outspokenness. This revolutionized the game of billiards, allowing the cue ball to be finely manipulated by the application of spin.
In 1807 he was released from prison and began to demonstrate his invention and spin technique in Paris. Part of his showmanship involved feigning extreme horror as the cue ball recoiled towards him after striking the object ball, and then persuading the audience that the balls should be seized and condemned because they were “tormented by a devil”.

Pegged construction, with delightful turned finials and other details. Retaining its original worn and alligatored red, ...
03/17/2020

Pegged construction, with delightful turned finials and other details. Retaining its original worn and alligatored red, blue and yellow paint, making for a great surface!

47.5" tall x 30" at its widest x 59" long, with the hinged, foldable rear legs fully extended.
$975

Pegged construction, with delightful turned finials and other details. Retaining its original worn and alligatored red, blue and yellow paint, making for a great surface!

47.5" tall x 30" at its widest x 59" long, with the hinged, foldable rear legs fully extended.
$975

Nearly 10 feet long, this 19th century farm table has its original primitive surface, and mortise and pegged constructio...
03/17/2020

Nearly 10 feet long, this 19th century farm table has its original primitive surface, and mortise and pegged construction. The bottom few inches of most of the legs are rotted, and will either need to be repaired or cut down. 118”l x 35.5”w x 35”t. Price reflects the needed repairs. Legs fixed, cleaned, waxed, and ready to go, I’d be asking $1200.
$650 as-is.

Nearly 10 feet long, this 19th century farm table has its original primitive surface, and mortise and pegged construction. The bottom few inches of most of the legs are rotted, and will either need to be repaired or cut down. 118”l x 35.5”w x 35”t. Price reflects the needed repairs. Legs fixed, cleaned, waxed, and ready to go, I’d be asking $1200.
$650 as-is.

Turn of the (20th) century display showcase. In very good condition, but will need some cleaning and polishing.Brass wra...
03/17/2020

Turn of the (20th) century display showcase. In very good condition, but will need some cleaning and polishing.

Brass wrapped feet, and a clam shell opening. It measures 9’ long x 3’ wide x 38.25” inches tall. $500

A nice example and would be perfect for an antiques shop, jewelry store, etc.

$600

Turn of the (20th) century display showcase. In very good condition, but will need some cleaning and polishing.

Brass wrapped feet, and a clam shell opening. It measures 9’ long x 3’ wide x 38.25” inches tall. $500

A nice example and would be perfect for an antiques shop, jewelry store, etc.

$600

19th century heavy oak farm table with turned legs and a lower shelf supported by a stretcher base. Although the paint, ...
03/17/2020

19th century heavy oak farm table with turned legs and a lower shelf supported by a stretcher base. Although the paint, featuring the American Flag and a bible verse is contemporary it has been naturally weathered and has the worn, chippy, shabby chic surface. 74”l x 37”w x 35”t. $450.

19th century heavy oak farm table with turned legs and a lower shelf supported by a stretcher base. Although the paint, featuring the American Flag and a bible verse is contemporary it has been naturally weathered and has the worn, chippy, shabby chic surface. 74”l x 37”w x 35”t. $450.

Cowboy, Old West, Mountain Man, Jeremiah Johnson.Dating from the first quarter of the 20th century.The hide is in good c...
12/19/2019

Cowboy, Old West, Mountain Man, Jeremiah Johnson.
Dating from the first quarter of the 20th century.
The hide is in good condition, with soft leather, and only minor loss to the fur.
The cotton lining has taken a beating. It fits like a size 40 - 42.
See captions below individual photos for more details.

Cowboy, Old West, Mountain Man, Jeremiah Johnson.
Dating from the first quarter of the 20th century.
The hide is in good condition, with soft leather, and only minor loss to the fur.
The cotton lining has taken a beating. It fits like a size 40 - 42.
See captions below individual photos for more details.

For the advanced collector. This mid to late 1800's tin, hand cut, rolled, and polychrome painted, 2-sided sign would ha...
12/10/2019

For the advanced collector. This mid to late 1800's tin, hand cut, rolled, and polychrome painted, 2-sided sign would have hung from the ceiling, above a pool table. The four unfortunate holes were from this sign being displayed in a TGI's type bar/pub/tavern/restaurant. One side is 100% intact, reading, "Masse or Lofting Not Allowed", the reverse, which has considerable loss, read (I'm speculating here), "Keep Balls on the Tables". 100% genuine, authentic, and original with the exception of the four screw holes. $600.

For the advanced collector. This mid to late 1800's tin, hand cut, rolled, and polychrome painted, 2-sided sign would have hung from the ceiling, above a pool table. The four unfortunate holes were from this sign being displayed in a TGI's type bar/pub/tavern/restaurant. One side is 100% intact, reading, "Masse or Lofting Not Allowed", the reverse, which has considerable loss, read (I'm speculating here), "Keep Balls on the Tables". 100% genuine, authentic, and original with the exception of the four screw holes. $600.

John B. Stetson, the famous hat manufacturer from Philadelphia created the “Boss of the Plains” hat in 1863, which he de...
12/05/2019

John B. Stetson, the famous hat manufacturer from Philadelphia created the “Boss of the Plains” hat in 1863, which he designed while on an expedition up Pike’s Peak. By today’s standards, the hat was rather ordinary in design, with a round, flat brim and smooth, rounded crown. Stetson made the hat out of fine fur from beaver, rabbit and other small animals to withstand the elements. While only making one style of hat, they came in different qualities ranging from one-grade material at five dollars apiece to pure beaver felt hats for thirty dollars each. J.B. Stetson was the first to market the “Boss of the Plains” to cowboys, and thanks to its durability, it was ideal for the demands of the working Westerner and became incredibly popular. However, most Stetsons got pretty beat up on the job and began to curl at the brim and lose their silk ribbons. But this distressed look became preferred to the overly-refined, fresh-off-the-line Stetson. So much so that many cowboys even began to intentionally shape their own hats by creasing the crown and curling the brim, making four dents into a peak, two dents, a center crease, two parallel creases, or simply leaving the crown rounded. Stetson soon caught on to this trend and began mass-producing the creased and curled hats that have remained the universal image of the American West. This charisma of the West was carried back East when adventurers returned in the expensive “Boss of the plains” style hat. In the 19th century and first half of the 20th century, a hat was an indispensable item in every man’s wardrobe. Stetson focused on expensive, high-quality hats that represented a real investment for the working cowboy and a statement of success for the city dweller. In the 1940s and ‘50s, Hollywood—a space seldom concerned with historical accuracy—created its own cowboy styles on the big screen, which then rubbed off on cowboy fashion, carrying homogenized hat styles from the silver screen to the range and far beyond. Contemporary American Country Music stars—whether real cowboys or not—further popularized the wearing of cowboy hats far beyond just big cattle country. Information specific to the individual hat can be found in the comments under the first photo of the respective hat.

John B. Stetson, the famous hat manufacturer from Philadelphia created the “Boss of the Plains” hat in 1863, which he designed while on an expedition up Pike’s Peak. By today’s standards, the hat was rather ordinary in design, with a round, flat brim and smooth, rounded crown. Stetson made the hat out of fine fur from beaver, rabbit and other small animals to withstand the elements. While only making one style of hat, they came in different qualities ranging from one-grade material at five dollars apiece to pure beaver felt hats for thirty dollars each. J.B. Stetson was the first to market the “Boss of the Plains” to cowboys, and thanks to its durability, it was ideal for the demands of the working Westerner and became incredibly popular. However, most Stetsons got pretty beat up on the job and began to curl at the brim and lose their silk ribbons. But this distressed look became preferred to the overly-refined, fresh-off-the-line Stetson. So much so that many cowboys even began to intentionally shape their own hats by creasing the crown and curling the brim, making four dents into a peak, two dents, a center crease, two parallel creases, or simply leaving the crown rounded. Stetson soon caught on to this trend and began mass-producing the creased and curled hats that have remained the universal image of the American West. This charisma of the West was carried back East when adventurers returned in the expensive “Boss of the plains” style hat. In the 19th century and first half of the 20th century, a hat was an indispensable item in every man’s wardrobe. Stetson focused on expensive, high-quality hats that represented a real investment for the working cowboy and a statement of success for the city dweller. In the 1940s and ‘50s, Hollywood—a space seldom concerned with historical accuracy—created its own cowboy styles on the big screen, which then rubbed off on cowboy fashion, carrying homogenized hat styles from the silver screen to the range and far beyond. Contemporary American Country Music stars—whether real cowboys or not—further popularized the wearing of cowboy hats far beyond just big cattle country. Information specific to the individual hat can be found in the comments under the first photo of the respective hat.

Heavy paper. Framed, under glass. Very nice condition with full calendar pad. 15" x 27". Horse and rider. Hunter Jumper....
12/05/2019

Heavy paper. Framed, under glass. Very nice condition with full calendar pad. 15" x 27". Horse and rider. Hunter Jumper. Equestrian.

Heavy paper. Framed, under glass. Very nice condition with full calendar pad. 15" x 27". Horse and rider. Hunter Jumper. Equestrian.

11/27/2019
11/27/2019
For the advanced collector. This mid to late 1800's tin, hand cut, rolled, and polychrome painted, 2-sided sign would ha...
11/23/2019

For the advanced collector. This mid to late 1800's tin, hand cut, rolled, and polychrome painted, 2-sided sign would have hung from the ceiling, above a pool table. The four unfortunate holes were from this sign being displayed in a TGI's type bar/pub/tavern/restaurant. One side is 100% intact, reading, "Masse or Lofting Not Allowed", the reverse, which has considerable loss, read (I'm speculating here), "Keep Balls on the Tables". 100% genuine, authentic, and original with the exception of the four screw holes. $600.

For the advanced collector. This mid to late 1800's tin, hand cut, rolled, and polychrome painted, 2-sided sign would have hung from the ceiling, above a pool table. The four unfortunate holes were from this sign being displayed in a TGI's type bar/pub/tavern/restaurant. One side is 100% intact, reading, "Masse or Lofting Not Allowed", the reverse, which has considerable loss, read (I'm speculating here), "Keep Balls on the Tables". 100% genuine, authentic, and original with the exception of the four screw holes. $600.

Group of 4 antique/vintage souvenirs from the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Indy 500. I'm guessing they date between the ...
11/22/2019

Group of 4 antique/vintage souvenirs from the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Indy 500. I'm guessing they date between the 1950's & 1970's. Any help with dating them would be appreciated. 2 visors and 1 hat/cap. None appear to have ever been worn. They are in great condition, with the only apology being the creases that developed from being stored flat. Made from a cotton canvas or burlap type material. The visors have multi-color plastic or Bakelite grommets/vent holes. Also, an 8x10 B&W glossy of Jim Rathmann endorsing Firestone tires in a period correct (walnut?) frame. Jim Rathmann (July 16, 1928 – November 23, 2011), born Royal Richard Rathmann, was an American race car driver who won the Indianapolis 500 in 1960. A very nice group of automotive racing history.

Group of 4 antique/vintage souvenirs from the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Indy 500. I'm guessing they date between the 1950's & 1970's. Any help with dating them would be appreciated. 2 visors and 1 hat/cap. None appear to have ever been worn. They are in great condition, with the only apology being the creases that developed from being stored flat. Made from a cotton canvas or burlap type material. The visors have multi-color plastic or Bakelite grommets/vent holes. Also, an 8x10 B&W glossy of Jim Rathmann endorsing Firestone tires in a period correct (walnut?) frame. Jim Rathmann (July 16, 1928 – November 23, 2011), born Royal Richard Rathmann, was an American race car driver who won the Indianapolis 500 in 1960. A very nice group of automotive racing history.

Group of 4 antique/vintage souvenirs from the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Indy 500. I'm guessing they date between the ...
11/18/2019

Group of 4 antique/vintage souvenirs from the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Indy 500. I'm guessing they date between the 1950's & 1970's. Any help with dating them would be appreciated. 2 visors and 1 hat/cap. None appear to have ever been worn. They are in great condition, with the only apology being the creases that developed from being stored flat. Made from a cotton canvas or burlap type material. The visors have multi-color plastic or Bakelite grommets/vent holes. Also, an 8x10 B&W glossy of Jim Rathmann endorsing Firestone tires in a period correct (walnut?) frame. Jim Rathmann (July 16, 1928 – November 23, 2011), born Royal Richard Rathmann, was an American race car driver who won the Indianapolis 500 in 1960. A very nice group of automotive racing history.

Group of 4 antique/vintage souvenirs from the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Indy 500. I'm guessing they date between the 1950's & 1970's. Any help with dating them would be appreciated. 2 visors and 1 hat/cap. None appear to have ever been worn. They are in great condition, with the only apology being the creases that developed from being stored flat. Made from a cotton canvas or burlap type material. The visors have multi-color plastic or Bakelite grommets/vent holes. Also, an 8x10 B&W glossy of Jim Rathmann endorsing Firestone tires in a period correct (walnut?) frame. Jim Rathmann (July 16, 1928 – November 23, 2011), born Royal Richard Rathmann, was an American race car driver who won the Indianapolis 500 in 1960. A very nice group of automotive racing history.

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My Barn
Leesburg, VA
20175

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