Hiddlestone Electrics Pty Ltd Ec1120

Hiddlestone Electrics Pty Ltd Ec1120 Established in 1920, we are proud to be Subiaco's longest established electricians. Hiddlestone Electrics is building on the wonderful legacy of the late Vern Hiddlestone.

We continue to provide the community with good old fashioned service, whilst implementing modern ethics. We are unique in terms of restoring and rewiring chandeliers and lamps.

Operating as usual

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year from everyone at Hiddlestone Electrics! Whatever you’re doing, have a great break 🐶._...
24/12/2021

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year from everyone at Hiddlestone Electrics! Whatever you’re doing, have a great break 🐶.

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📸: City of Subiaco for the 'We Are Subiaco' Series (Mar. 2021)

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year from everyone at Hiddlestone Electrics! Whatever you’re doing, have a great break 🐶.

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📸: City of Subiaco for the 'We Are Subiaco' Series (Mar. 2021)

11/12/2021

And just like that Tom is 16!! Happy birthday mate ❤️😊🎉🎈🥳

Whilst installing additional lighting I got to see some gorgeous Art Deco lights we had rewired and installed 10 years a...
07/12/2021

Whilst installing additional lighting I got to see some gorgeous Art Deco lights we had rewired and installed 10 years ago.

This time last year we celebrated our family business’s centenary milestone in Hiddlestone Lane and Old Values, Subiaco!...
28/11/2021
A Look Back at Hiddlestone's Centenary Event Celebration (29/11/20)

This time last year we celebrated our family business’s centenary milestone in Hiddlestone Lane and Old Values, Subiaco!

Hiddlestone Electrics and Hiddlestone Bros. was so proud of this achievement servicing our very special local community for the past century (and now into a new century!) - which has paved the way for our continued success and contributions to a thriving, vibrant Subiaco well into the future.

When our iconic family electrical company in Subiaco racked up 100 years of service to our local community, that really was a cause for celebration … and we were determined to do it last year, no matter what!

With many thanks again to all our friends & family, centenary event partners and supporters who joined us to celebrate. This was a special memory we created together.
#hiddlestone100notout

Video: Joshua Spice Media / Story National
Photography: Josh Wells Photography
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Digital Book:
https://tinyurl.com/y6slmxlm

The Write Attitude Story National Josh Wells Photography The Pink Tank Creative City of Subiaco See Subiaco Family Business Australia Hiddlestone Hub Clipsal by Schneider Electric Rexel Electrical Supplies Australia Rexel Osborne Park

This time last year Hiddlestone Electrics and Hiddlestone Bros. celebrated their family business’s centenary milestone! The Hiddlestone family was so proud o...

Coloured crystal complete!
05/11/2021

Coloured crystal complete!

Coloured crystal complete!

We have Perth’s largest range of cloth covered cables (and can restore lights and chandeliers to Australian standards) 😊
30/10/2021

We have Perth’s largest range of cloth covered cables (and can restore lights and chandeliers to Australian standards) 😊

We have Perth’s largest range of cloth covered cables (and can restore lights and chandeliers to Australian standards) 😊

Free Guide
27/10/2021
Free Guide

Free Guide

Build & Manage My Electrical Business

20/10/2021

Always nice to get positive feedback 👍😊

Hi Natalie. Paul’s came, saw, conquered the problem and left. Thanks to both of you (and Hiddlestone) for your prompt and effective assistance. Kind regards Michael

Hiddlestone lane now has coloured crystals!
18/10/2021

Hiddlestone lane now has coloured crystals!

Hiddlestone lane now has coloured crystals!

09/10/2021

Some funky tunes resonating from Hiddlestone Lane with Suburban Vibes till 5pm

A lady brought this beautiful lamp in to be rewired. She tells the story of how she found it  (originally an oil lamp) a...
18/09/2021

A lady brought this beautiful lamp in to be rewired. She tells the story of how she found it (originally an oil lamp) at Rotto when she was 10 years old and Vern electrified it at least 50 years ago…It was still working but the mounting that housed the lampholder snapped just last week.
Workmanship that has stood the test of time for over 50 years….now you don’t see that these days!!
We left the set up exactly as dad had done it but replaced all components to today’s standards.
Still learning from you dad ❤️

A lady brought this beautiful lamp in to be rewired. She tells the story of how she found it (originally an oil lamp) at Rotto when she was 10 years old and Vern electrified it at least 50 years ago…It was still working but the mounting that housed the lampholder snapped just last week.
Workmanship that has stood the test of time for over 50 years….now you don’t see that these days!!
We left the set up exactly as dad had done it but replaced all components to today’s standards.
Still learning from you dad ❤️

Trialling a new answering service 😂
03/09/2021

Trialling a new answering service 😂

Trialling a new answering service 😂

20/08/2021

How cool is this flicker flame globe?

This light was originally on a horse drawn carriage in 1910. We electrified and restored it including replacing the glas...
13/08/2021

This light was originally on a horse drawn carriage in 1910. We electrified and restored it including replacing the glass panels and modifying a lamp base to accomodate the arm of the coach light…it turned out amazing- well done Steve!

This light was originally on a horse drawn carriage in 1910. We electrified and restored it including replacing the glass panels and modifying a lamp base to accomodate the arm of the coach light…it turned out amazing- well done Steve!

Comet Motors receipt from 1930, possibly for the purchase of a Hiddlestone company vehicle.From our book: '100 Not Out' ...
10/08/2021

Comet Motors receipt from 1930, possibly for the purchase of a Hiddlestone company vehicle.

From our book: '100 Not Out' by Ross Addison

Comet Motors receipt from 1930, possibly for the purchase of a Hiddlestone company vehicle.

From our book: '100 Not Out' by Ross Addison

Staff meeting
02/08/2021

Staff meeting

Staff meeting

Group shot of Perth PWD trainees, early 1900s. Howard Hiddlestone is pictured front centre, with his hand on his hat.Fro...
28/07/2021

Group shot of Perth PWD trainees, early 1900s. Howard Hiddlestone is pictured front centre, with his hand on his hat.

From our book: '100 Not Out' by Ross Addison

Group shot of Perth PWD trainees, early 1900s. Howard Hiddlestone is pictured front centre, with his hand on his hat.

From our book: '100 Not Out' by Ross Addison

Hiddlestone Bros blotter from the 1920s.From our book: '100 Not Out' by Ross Addison
16/07/2021

Hiddlestone Bros blotter from the 1920s.

From our book: '100 Not Out' by Ross Addison

Hiddlestone Bros blotter from the 1920s.

From our book: '100 Not Out' by Ross Addison

AN ‘ELECTRIFYING’ TIME (cont.)The tyre business followed, with a retreading service proving to be a smart move due to th...
03/06/2021

AN ‘ELECTRIFYING’ TIME (cont.)

The tyre business followed, with a retreading service proving to be a smart move due to the high cost of new car tyres, which they also stocked. They used steam boilers in what was called ‘recapping’ and, even though the equipment was quite primitive by today’s standards, they must have done a pretty good job, because they had customers in their cars lined up around the corner that unfortunately led to the odd traffic jam.

Eventually the brothers shifted the business to bigger premises with more options when they purchased 83 Rokeby Road, on the opposite side of their original site, closer to Hay Street.

Vern takes up his story again:

“Because the electrical business was going so well, and growing so fast at that stage, the tyre and battery side was ‘put on the shelf’. Besides, there were a number of other bigger tyre companies opening up in the area. So, they switched their focus to the electrical business, which boomed because of the close relationship the business had with Subiaco and its people.

“Dad said that he was pretty glad to see the back of the tyre and battery business because of the smells. They would vulcanise the rubber to patch the tyres and recap them and the stench of burning rubber would fill the air.

“And then there were the batteries, bubbling away with their harsh acid-smell they created while they were recharged. Combine that with the steam from the boiler and unbearable heat of the furnace, all confined within the walls of a solid brick property, originally designed as a shop, with no ventilation, it was not only unpleasant but also a fire trap.”

Pictured: Our original premises, 140 Rokeby Road, Subiaco

Excerpt from our book: '100 Not Out' by Ross Addison

AN ‘ELECTRIFYING’ TIME (cont.)

The tyre business followed, with a retreading service proving to be a smart move due to the high cost of new car tyres, which they also stocked. They used steam boilers in what was called ‘recapping’ and, even though the equipment was quite primitive by today’s standards, they must have done a pretty good job, because they had customers in their cars lined up around the corner that unfortunately led to the odd traffic jam.

Eventually the brothers shifted the business to bigger premises with more options when they purchased 83 Rokeby Road, on the opposite side of their original site, closer to Hay Street.

Vern takes up his story again:

“Because the electrical business was going so well, and growing so fast at that stage, the tyre and battery side was ‘put on the shelf’. Besides, there were a number of other bigger tyre companies opening up in the area. So, they switched their focus to the electrical business, which boomed because of the close relationship the business had with Subiaco and its people.

“Dad said that he was pretty glad to see the back of the tyre and battery business because of the smells. They would vulcanise the rubber to patch the tyres and recap them and the stench of burning rubber would fill the air.

“And then there were the batteries, bubbling away with their harsh acid-smell they created while they were recharged. Combine that with the steam from the boiler and unbearable heat of the furnace, all confined within the walls of a solid brick property, originally designed as a shop, with no ventilation, it was not only unpleasant but also a fire trap.”

Pictured: Our original premises, 140 Rokeby Road, Subiaco

Excerpt from our book: '100 Not Out' by Ross Addison

Looks like a working holiday could be on the cards
02/06/2021

Looks like a working holiday could be on the cards

Looks like a working holiday could be on the cards

30/05/2021

Molly is a dream on the lead - check her out!!

AN ‘ELECTRIFYING’ TIME (cont.)Young Cecil Hiddlestone, or ‘Cec’ as his name, like his brother Bert’s, would also be shor...
18/05/2021

AN ‘ELECTRIFYING’ TIME (cont.)

Young Cecil Hiddlestone, or ‘Cec’ as his name, like his brother Bert’s, would also be shortened to, didn’t care too much for school and spent all his weekends and spare time helping his older brothers out in the shop and on job sites. He was keen to join Howard and Bert and would, in years to come, play a major role in shaping the future of the family business.

Even back then, the idea of a ‘mixed business’ outlet was taking root - with Howard running his growing electrical business from premises that would later also house an automobile tyre and battery service. One half of the shopfront was for the range of car batteries, tyres and a retreading and repair services and the other side was for their electrical wiring and contracting business, with Bert overseeing the smooth running of both businesses.

In an interview Vern Hiddlestone, Cec’s son, gave to the Subiaco Historical Society in the late 1980s, Vern recalled memories of the business related to him by his father:
“Howard, Dad’s oldest brother, was interested in radio and was quite the pioneer, building some of those early valve radio sets. The brothers all loved their sport and always used to listen to the cricket broadcast from England. Howard built these major towers, at least 50 metres high, with all these insulators and wires hanging off them that he would feed into the shop so they could listen to the cricket.

“His interest in, and knowledge of radio, led him to serve as a motorcycle dispatch rider in the Army during WWI. He was a Sapper who was attached as a signaller in the famous 10th Light Horse, while his father and my grandfather, Albert was a Corporal who served in Egypt.

“When he returned from the war, he used the radio repair skills learned in the Army to add a radio repair service as part of the electrical business he opened in 1920.

“Dad said that, as the company grew, they added more ‘luxurious’ transport to their work fleet – a Model T Ford and an old Chrysler. Apparently, the place was always pretty busy. In response to growing demand from automobile drivers, they also set up a battery business that proved very popular.”

Pictured: Young Cec with sister Isabel holding radio aerials built by brother Howard, listening to early radio

Excerpt from our book: '100 Not Out' by Ross Addison

AN ‘ELECTRIFYING’ TIME (cont.)

Young Cecil Hiddlestone, or ‘Cec’ as his name, like his brother Bert’s, would also be shortened to, didn’t care too much for school and spent all his weekends and spare time helping his older brothers out in the shop and on job sites. He was keen to join Howard and Bert and would, in years to come, play a major role in shaping the future of the family business.

Even back then, the idea of a ‘mixed business’ outlet was taking root - with Howard running his growing electrical business from premises that would later also house an automobile tyre and battery service. One half of the shopfront was for the range of car batteries, tyres and a retreading and repair services and the other side was for their electrical wiring and contracting business, with Bert overseeing the smooth running of both businesses.

In an interview Vern Hiddlestone, Cec’s son, gave to the Subiaco Historical Society in the late 1980s, Vern recalled memories of the business related to him by his father:
“Howard, Dad’s oldest brother, was interested in radio and was quite the pioneer, building some of those early valve radio sets. The brothers all loved their sport and always used to listen to the cricket broadcast from England. Howard built these major towers, at least 50 metres high, with all these insulators and wires hanging off them that he would feed into the shop so they could listen to the cricket.

“His interest in, and knowledge of radio, led him to serve as a motorcycle dispatch rider in the Army during WWI. He was a Sapper who was attached as a signaller in the famous 10th Light Horse, while his father and my grandfather, Albert was a Corporal who served in Egypt.

“When he returned from the war, he used the radio repair skills learned in the Army to add a radio repair service as part of the electrical business he opened in 1920.

“Dad said that, as the company grew, they added more ‘luxurious’ transport to their work fleet – a Model T Ford and an old Chrysler. Apparently, the place was always pretty busy. In response to growing demand from automobile drivers, they also set up a battery business that proved very popular.”

Pictured: Young Cec with sister Isabel holding radio aerials built by brother Howard, listening to early radio

Excerpt from our book: '100 Not Out' by Ross Addison

Perth PWD trainees attending an early ‘Electrical Wireman’ course, early 1900s. A young Howard Hiddlestone is pictured i...
30/04/2021

Perth PWD trainees attending an early ‘Electrical Wireman’ course, early 1900s. A young Howard Hiddlestone is pictured in the back seat behind the driver of what looks like an early Model T Ford ute.

Excerpt from our book: '100 Not Out' by Ross Addison

Perth PWD trainees attending an early ‘Electrical Wireman’ course, early 1900s. A young Howard Hiddlestone is pictured in the back seat behind the driver of what looks like an early Model T Ford ute.

Excerpt from our book: '100 Not Out' by Ross Addison

HOWARD’S CLAIM TO FAMEAccording to Howard Hiddlestone's daughter Eunice, his one big claim to fame from his service in E...
25/04/2021

HOWARD’S CLAIM TO FAME

According to Howard Hiddlestone's daughter Eunice, his one big claim to fame from his service in Egypt during WWI was that he met Colonel T.E. Lawrence, 'Lawrence of Arabia'.

The story goes that Howard encountered Lawrence coming out of the desert on a camel while Howard was in the process of delivering a message as a motor-bike dispatch rider. Lawrence hailed Howard and asked if he could es**rt him to the battalion HQ, which Howard, not knowing who he was, did as instructed by his superior officer.

As a thank you, Lawrence then invited Howard to join him for a drink and took him into the Officer’s Mess. Being an ordinary rank soldier, Howard declined, saying that he would get into trouble. Colonel Lawrence apparently didn’t stand on ceremony and said to Howard, “They wouldn’t
dare do anything to you. Not when you are drinking with Lawrence of Arabia.”

Pictured: Father & son in AIF uniform, WWI (Albert Hiddlestone, left & son Howard, right)

Excerpt from our book: '100 Not Out' by Ross Addison

#lestweforget

HOWARD’S CLAIM TO FAME

According to Howard Hiddlestone's daughter Eunice, his one big claim to fame from his service in Egypt during WWI was that he met Colonel T.E. Lawrence, 'Lawrence of Arabia'.

The story goes that Howard encountered Lawrence coming out of the desert on a camel while Howard was in the process of delivering a message as a motor-bike dispatch rider. Lawrence hailed Howard and asked if he could es**rt him to the battalion HQ, which Howard, not knowing who he was, did as instructed by his superior officer.

As a thank you, Lawrence then invited Howard to join him for a drink and took him into the Officer’s Mess. Being an ordinary rank soldier, Howard declined, saying that he would get into trouble. Colonel Lawrence apparently didn’t stand on ceremony and said to Howard, “They wouldn’t
dare do anything to you. Not when you are drinking with Lawrence of Arabia.”

Pictured: Father & son in AIF uniform, WWI (Albert Hiddlestone, left & son Howard, right)

Excerpt from our book: '100 Not Out' by Ross Addison

#lestweforget

23/04/2021
AN ‘ELECTRIFYING’ TIMEThe year was 1920 and 22-year old Howard Hiddlestone, a young ex-soldier not long returned from th...
23/04/2021

AN ‘ELECTRIFYING’ TIME

The year was 1920 and 22-year old Howard Hiddlestone, a young ex-soldier not long returned from the Great War with big dreams and a vision for the future, slowly pushed his rickety old push bike in a southerly direction up Rokeby Road in Subiaco towards King’s Hall, where his newly opened business was based.

His trusty pair of pliers and wooden-handled screwdriver rubbed uncomfortably in the back pocket of his overalls, adding to his feeling of weariness after a long day on the tools. Distracted by the irritation in his back pocket, he nearly
dropped the old step ladder that was balanced precariously on his shoulders, as he steered his bicycle up the hill.

The modern wonder of electrification had not long come to households and businesses in Perth and the town of Subiaco, itself a fairly recent incarnation, just a stone’s throw from the city centre down along Hay Street, the recently sealed road that linked Perth to Subiaco.

Young Howard had seen the potential to service this exciting new utility and had initially established H. Hiddlestone Electrics in the hope of building a successful business.

Howard was the only qualified electrician in the family. After starting his working life as a technician with the Post Master General’s Office (the ‘PMG’ as it was known), he volunteered to serve in the AIF with his father, Albert, and the other brave young Western Australian men, who signed up to defend
King and Country.

Fortunately, Howard and his father returned safely from the war and, under the auspices of a Federal Government scheme to help veterans integrate back into the workforce, Howard decided to try his hand as an ‘electrical wireman’ in this relatively new industry, no doubt seeing the opportunities that would open up as electrification gained popularity with local residents and businesses.

He had plans for his younger 13-year old brother Cecil, to join him as his apprentice and other brother Albert, who everyone called ‘Bert’, was already on board handling the walk-in trade to their King’s Hall premises.

Pictured: A young Howard Hiddlestone posing for the camera on his dispatch rider’s motorbike in Egypt during WWI

Excerpt from our book: '100 Not Out' by Ross Addison

#lestweforget

AN ‘ELECTRIFYING’ TIME

The year was 1920 and 22-year old Howard Hiddlestone, a young ex-soldier not long returned from the Great War with big dreams and a vision for the future, slowly pushed his rickety old push bike in a southerly direction up Rokeby Road in Subiaco towards King’s Hall, where his newly opened business was based.

His trusty pair of pliers and wooden-handled screwdriver rubbed uncomfortably in the back pocket of his overalls, adding to his feeling of weariness after a long day on the tools. Distracted by the irritation in his back pocket, he nearly
dropped the old step ladder that was balanced precariously on his shoulders, as he steered his bicycle up the hill.

The modern wonder of electrification had not long come to households and businesses in Perth and the town of Subiaco, itself a fairly recent incarnation, just a stone’s throw from the city centre down along Hay Street, the recently sealed road that linked Perth to Subiaco.

Young Howard had seen the potential to service this exciting new utility and had initially established H. Hiddlestone Electrics in the hope of building a successful business.

Howard was the only qualified electrician in the family. After starting his working life as a technician with the Post Master General’s Office (the ‘PMG’ as it was known), he volunteered to serve in the AIF with his father, Albert, and the other brave young Western Australian men, who signed up to defend
King and Country.

Fortunately, Howard and his father returned safely from the war and, under the auspices of a Federal Government scheme to help veterans integrate back into the workforce, Howard decided to try his hand as an ‘electrical wireman’ in this relatively new industry, no doubt seeing the opportunities that would open up as electrification gained popularity with local residents and businesses.

He had plans for his younger 13-year old brother Cecil, to join him as his apprentice and other brother Albert, who everyone called ‘Bert’, was already on board handling the walk-in trade to their King’s Hall premises.

Pictured: A young Howard Hiddlestone posing for the camera on his dispatch rider’s motorbike in Egypt during WWI

Excerpt from our book: '100 Not Out' by Ross Addison

#lestweforget

Address

30 Townshend Rd
Perth, WA
6008

Opening Hours

Monday 8am - 5pm
Tuesday 8am - 5pm
Wednesday 8am - 5pm
Thursday 8am - 5pm
Friday 8am - 3:30pm

Telephone

+61893811918

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Comments

What a fantastic company, I highly recommend them. Great service, friendly and very helpful. Just like the old days. Thank you.